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DHM730.  USS Colorado Okinawa by Anthony Saunders.<p>The USS Colorado holds the all time record of 37 consecutive days of firing at an enemy and the record of 24 direct enemy air attacks in 62 days both while at Okinawa. <b><p>  Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.<p>Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)
DHM1417. Boiling Point - USS Missouri  by Anthony Saunders. <p>Launched on the 29th of January 1944, USS Missouri was the last and one of the finest battleships of any fleet.  With a top speed of 33 knots, she earnt the name Fast Battleship, as the Iowa class to which she belonged were known.  Bristling with an assortment of anti-aircraft, Missouri was as much a floating anti-aircraft battery as a battleship.  With these qualities Missouri was well equiped to counter the desperate aerial attacks faced when she joined the Pacific Fleet.  Here Missouri is seen repelling a kamikaze attack on the 11th of April 1945, with the destroyers Melvin (left) and McCord.  Although one of the kamikazes did get through the curtain of shell fire, little damage was sustained.<b><p> Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p>Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm)

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  Website Price: 145.00  

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US Navy Battleship Art Prints by Anthony Saunders.

PCK1753. US Navy Battleship Art Prints by Anthony Saunders.

Naval Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM730. USS Colorado Okinawa by Anthony Saunders.

The USS Colorado holds the all time record of 37 consecutive days of firing at an enemy and the record of 24 direct enemy air attacks in 62 days both while at Okinawa.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM1417. Boiling Point - USS Missouri by Anthony Saunders.

Launched on the 29th of January 1944, USS Missouri was the last and one of the finest battleships of any fleet. With a top speed of 33 knots, she earnt the name Fast Battleship, as the Iowa class to which she belonged were known. Bristling with an assortment of anti-aircraft, Missouri was as much a floating anti-aircraft battery as a battleship. With these qualities Missouri was well equiped to counter the desperate aerial attacks faced when she joined the Pacific Fleet. Here Missouri is seen repelling a kamikaze attack on the 11th of April 1945, with the destroyers Melvin (left) and McCord. Although one of the kamikazes did get through the curtain of shell fire, little damage was sustained.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm)


Website Price: 145.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost 220.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save 75




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

This Week's Half Price Art

After the capture of the Magazine on 16th September 1857, at the Siege of Delhi, the mutineers staged a counter-attack. Several times they set light to the thatched roof adjacent to the perimeter wall. The actual Magazine was a building in the centre of the compound, but it had been blown up by the British earlier in the siege, leaving the perimeter wall intact. At that time there were buildings between the Magazine and the Red Fort. Lieutenant Renny of the Bengal Horse Artillery mounted the wall and flung 5.5 inch shells, with their fuses lit, into the midst of the enemy, although he was under heavy fire from the walls of the Palace (the Red Fort) and Selinghur (an outlying fortification). For this action he was later awarded the Victoria Cross.  I have depicted men of Renny's 5th (Native) Troop, 1st Brigade, Bengal Horse Artillery lighting shells with a portfire. Soldiers of the Belooch Regiment (in green uniforms) are handing these up to Renny. Other soldiers of HM's 61st Regiment, which had captured the Magazine that morning, are seen lining the wall and attempting to put out the fire in the compound. Some are in khaki and some in shirt sleeves.  In the hot weather at the Siege of Delhi, most British troops wore their white summer uniforms, often dyed locally to produce varying shades of khaki, sometimes described as a slate-grey blue colour. I have depicted Renny, who was 31 years old, with his pouch belt worn over his left shoulder, and his Undress sword belt (as described in the Standing Orders for the Bengal Horse Artillery). He and his men wore their forage caps with a cover and a neck curtain for protection from the sun.
Lt A Renny VC, Bengal Horse Artillery at the Delhi Magazine 1857 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
In 1857, during the Indian Mutiny, the 5th (Northumberland) (Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot was part of Major-General James Outram's little force which fought its way to Cawnpore, where the haggard remnants of Major-General Sir Henry Havelock's regiments had been besieged by the mutineers.  Then together, their combined force marched on 21st September, in a deluge of rain, to attempt the relief of Lucknow.  They fought their way across a flooded landscape towards the Alam Bagh, the Prince of Oudh's garden palace, where 12,000 of the enemy barred the way, with their cannon commanding the road.  The Alam Bagh was a very large enclosure, with a wall all around it.  At each of the four corners of the wall was a two-storeyed tower.  There was a gateway in the centre of each side of the wall.  In the centre of the enclosure was a palace, the Bara Dari.  On 23rd September, the British force advanced and drove the sepoys from their position.  The 5th Regiment, on the right, with the 78th Highlanders cleared the enemy from the Alam Bagh, and the British entered the enclosure.  All night it rained.  For three days Havelock's men had marched and fought in a downpour, and on the 24th he let them rest.  A reconnoitring party, under Lieutenant Brown, went forward from the Alam Bagh in skirmishing order, till they came under a heavy fire.  The sepoys closed in on the little party, as the British withdrew in good order.  Private E. Deveney had his leg carried away by a cannon-ball.  Brown ran back to him, followed by Corporal Grant.  Under a heavy fire they brought him safely to the Alam Bagh.  For this deed Corporal Grant was later awarded the Victoria Cross.  Next morning was dull and grey, the country a sea of mud.  Leaving 6 officers and 300 men at the Alam Bagh, the little British force advanced the last few miles to fight its way through the streets against tremendous odds, and into the besieged Residency at Lucknow.  The 5th Fusiliers were wearing white smock frocks and trousers.  White covers and neck curtains were also made for their forage caps, to which were affixed peaks removed from their unused shakos.  They were armed with the new Enfield rifles.  Officers in this campaign dressed how they pleased, and I have depicted Lieut. Brown wearing his red shell jacket.  In the background is the Alambagh.
Corporal Robert Grant VC and Lt Brown, 5th (Northumberland) Fusiliers Saving Pte Deveney, Returning Towards the Alambach, Lucknow after a reconnaissance 25th Sept. 1857 by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 The Battle of Isandlwana on 22 January 1879 was the first major encounter in the Anglo-Zulu War between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom.  Eleven days after the British commenced their invasion of Zululand in South Africa, a Zulu force of some 10,000-12,000 warriors attacked a portion of the British main column consisting of about 1,800 British, colonial and native troops and perhaps 400 civilians.  The Zulus were equipped mainly with the traditional Assegai iron spears and cow-hide shields, but also had a number of muskets and old rifles though they were not formally trained in their use.  The British and colonial troops were armed with the state-of-the-art Martini-Henry breech-loading rifle and two 7 pounder artillery pieces as well as a rocket battery.  Despite a vast disadvantage in weapons technology, the numerically superior Zulus ultimately overwhelmed the poorly led and badly deployed British, killing over 1,300 troops, including all those out on the forward firing line.  The Zulu army suffered around 350 killed, and up to several hundred wounded.  The battle was a crushing victory for the Zulus and caused the abandonment of the first British invasion of Zululand.

The Battle of Isandlwana by Jason Askew. (GM)
Half Price! - 300.00
DHM835GS. 19th Regiment Artillery (The Highland Gunners) by David Rowlands.
19th Regiment Artillery (The Highland Gunners) by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

GISD7977GL.  Portrait of Henry VIII by Hans Holbein.
Portrait of Henry VIII by Hans Holbein (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Replacements from 1st Battalion Irish Guards and Sherman tanks of the 46th Royal Tank Regiment move through the debris of Anzio town towards their jump-off positions for the Battle of Campoleone Station.

Anzio, Italy, February 1944 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - 70.00
The King's Regiment and the Atholl Brigade at the Battle of Culloden.  16 April 1746: At the Battle of Culloden the King's Regiment was on the extreme left flank of the Royal army. However, it was positioned en potence, at right angles to the line. The regiment was on rising ground, protected to some degree by the crumbling Leanach dyke, made of turf. The soldiers were in a position to open a deadly fire on the Highland right, should it make an attack. The Highlanders of the Atholl Brigade made a spirited charge, sword in hand, towards their right, and the King's Regiment opened a deadly flanking fire on the crowded mass of men. Wind and smoke blew towards the Highlanders. With bayonets fixed, and drawn up in three ranks, they were unable to miss at such close quarters. The officers carried spontoons, and sergeants, halberds. 
The Highlanders were mainly armed with old-fashioned muskets and powder horns, targes and broadswords.  King George I granted the regiment its title of The King's in 1716. It ranked in order of precedence as the 8th Regiment of Foot, and in 1746 was known as Wolfe's Regiment (named after its Colonel, Lieutenant-General Edward Wolfe).

The Battle of Culloden, 16th April 1746 by David Rowlands.
Half Price! - 75.00
 Shows the French Cuirassiers of the 2nd Empire of Napoleon the 3rd.

Le Drapeau by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00


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